DoYouEvenBench: Add Facebook's React TodoMVC test case
[WebKit-https.git] / PerformanceTests / DoYouEvenBench / todomvc / labs / architecture-examples / react / bower_components / director / README.md
1 <img src="https://github.com/flatiron/director/raw/master/img/director.png" />
2
3 # Synopsis
4 Director is a router. Routing is the process of determining what code to run when a URL is requested.
5
6 # Motivation
7 A routing library that works in both the browser and node.js environments with as few differences as possible. Simplifies the development of Single Page Apps and Node.js applications. Dependency free (doesn't require jQuery or Express, etc).
8
9 # Status
10 [![Build Status](https://secure.travis-ci.org/flatiron/director.png?branch=master)](http://travis-ci.org/flatiron/director)
11
12 # Features
13 * [Client-Side Routing](#client-side)
14 * [Server-Side HTTP Routing](#http-routing)
15 * [Server-Side CLI Routing](#cli-routing)
16
17
18 # Usage
19 * [API Documentation](#api-documentation)
20 * [Frequently Asked Questions](#faq)
21
22 <a name="client-side"></a>
23 ## Client-side Routing
24 It simply watches the hash of the URL to determine what to do, for example:
25
26 ```
27 http://foo.com/#/bar
28 ```
29
30 Client-side routing (aka hash-routing) allows you to specify some information about the state of the application using the URL. So that when the user visits a specific URL, the application can be transformed accordingly.
31
32 <img src="https://github.com/flatiron/director/raw/master/img/hashRoute.png" />
33
34 Here is a simple example:
35
36 ```html
37 <!DOCTYPE html>
38 <html>
39   <head>
40     <meta charset="utf-8">
41     <title>A Gentle Introduction</title>
42     <script src="https://raw.github.com/flatiron/director/master/build/director.min.js"></script>
43     <script>
44
45       var author = function () { console.log("author"); },
46           books = function () { console.log("books"); },
47           viewBook = function(bookId) { console.log("viewBook: bookId is populated: " + bookId); };
48
49       var routes = {
50         '/author': author,
51         '/books': [books, function() { console.log("An inline route handler."); }],
52         '/books/view/:bookId': viewBook
53       };
54
55       var router = Router(routes);
56       router.init();
57
58     </script>
59   </head>
60   <body>
61     <ul>
62       <li><a href="#/author">#/author</a></li>
63       <li><a href="#/books">#/books</a></li>
64       <li><a href="#/books/view/1">#/books/view/1</a></li>
65     </ul>
66   </body>
67 </html>
68 ```
69
70 Director works great with your favorite DOM library, such as jQuery.
71
72 ```html
73 <!DOCTYPE html>
74 <html>
75   <head>
76     <meta charset="utf-8">
77     <title>A Gentle Introduction 2</title>
78     <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
79     <script src="https://raw.github.com/flatiron/director/master/build/director.min.js"></script>
80     <script>
81     $('document').ready(function(){
82       //
83       // create some functions to be executed when
84       // the correct route is issued by the user.
85       //
86       var showAuthorInfo = function () { console.log("showAuthorInfo"); },
87           listBooks = function () { console.log("listBooks"); },
88           allroutes = function() {
89             var route = window.location.hash.slice(2),
90                 sections = $('section'),
91                 section;
92             if ((section = sections.filter('[data-route=' + route + ']')).length) {
93               sections.hide(250);
94               section.show(250);
95             }
96           };
97
98       //
99       // define the routing table.
100       //
101       var routes = {
102         '/author': showAuthorInfo,
103         '/books': listBooks
104       };
105
106       //
107       // instantiate the router.
108       //
109       var router = Router(routes);
110
111       //
112       // a global configuration setting.
113       //
114       router.configure({
115         on: allroutes
116       });
117       router.init();
118     });
119     </script>
120   </head>
121   <body>
122     <section data-route="author">Author Name</section>
123     <section data-route="books">Book1, Book2, Book3</section>
124     <ul>
125       <li><a href="#/author">#/author</a></li>
126       <li><a href="#/books">#/books</a></li>
127     </ul>
128   </body>
129 </html>
130 ```
131
132 You can find a browser-specific build of `director` [here][1] which has all of the server code stripped away.
133
134 <a name="http-routing"></a>
135 ## Server-Side HTTP Routing
136
137 Director handles routing for HTTP requests similar to `journey` or `express`:
138
139 ```js
140   //
141   // require the native http module, as well as director.
142   //
143   var http = require('http'),
144       director = require('director');
145
146   //
147   // create some logic to be routed to.
148   //
149   function helloWorld() {
150     this.res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-Type': 'text/plain' })
151     this.res.end('hello world');
152   }
153
154   //
155   // define a routing table.
156   //
157   var router = new director.http.Router({
158     '/hello': {
159       get: helloWorld
160     }
161   });
162
163   //
164   // setup a server and when there is a request, dispatch the
165   // route that was requested in the request object.
166   //
167   var server = http.createServer(function (req, res) {
168     router.dispatch(req, res, function (err) {
169       if (err) {
170         res.writeHead(404);
171         res.end();
172       }
173     });
174   });
175
176   //
177   // You can also do ad-hoc routing, similar to `journey` or `express`.
178   // This can be done with a string or a regexp.
179   //
180   router.get('/bonjour', helloWorld);
181   router.get(/hola/, helloWorld);
182
183   //
184   // set the server to listen on port `8080`.
185   //
186   server.listen(8080);
187 ```
188
189 ### See Also:
190
191  - Auto-generated Node.js API Clients for routers using [Director-Reflector](http://github.com/flatiron/director-reflector)
192  - RESTful Resource routing using [restful](http://github.com/flatiron/restful)
193  - HTML / Plain Text views of routers using [Director-Explorer](http://github.com/flatiron/director-explorer)
194
195 <a name="cli-routing"></a>
196 ## CLI Routing
197
198 Director supports Command Line Interface routing. Routes for cli options are based on command line input (i.e. `process.argv`) instead of a URL.
199
200 ``` js
201   var director = require('director');
202
203   var router = new director.cli.Router();
204
205   router.on('create', function () {
206     console.log('create something');
207   });
208
209   router.on(/destroy/, function () {
210     console.log('destroy something');
211   });
212
213   // You will need to dispatch the cli arguments yourself
214   router.dispatch('on', process.argv.slice(2).join(' '));
215 ```
216
217 Using the cli router, you can dispatch commands by passing them as a string. For example, if this example is in a file called `foo.js`:
218
219 ``` bash
220 $ node foo.js create
221 create something
222 $ node foo.js destroy
223 destroy something
224 ```
225
226 <a name="api-documentation"></a>
227 # API Documentation
228
229 * [Constructor](#constructor)
230 * [Routing Table](#routing-table)
231 * [Adhoc Routing](#adhoc-routing)
232 * [Scoped Routing](#scoped-routing)
233 * [Routing Events](#routing-events)
234 * [Configuration](#configuration)
235 * [URL Matching](#url-matching)
236 * [URL Params](#url-params)
237 * [Route Recursion](#route-recursion)
238 * [Async Routing](#async-routing)
239 * [Resources](#resources)
240 * [History API](#history-api)
241 * [Instance Methods](#instance-methods)
242 * [Attach Properties to `this`](#attach-to-this)
243 * [HTTP Streaming and Body Parsing](#http-streaming-body-parsing)
244
245 <a name="constructor"></a>
246 ## Constructor
247
248 ``` js
249   var router = Router(routes);
250 ```
251
252 <a name="routing-table"></a>
253 ## Routing Table
254
255 An object literal that contains nested route definitions. A potentially nested set of key/value pairs. The keys in the object literal represent each potential part of the URL. The values in the object literal contain references to the functions that should be associated with them. *bark* and *meow* are two functions that you have defined in your code.
256
257 ``` js
258   //
259   // Assign routes to an object literal.
260   //
261   var routes = {
262     //
263     // a route which assigns the function `bark`.
264     //
265     '/dog': bark,
266     //
267     // a route which assigns the functions `meow` and `scratch`.
268     //
269     '/cat': [meow, scratch]
270   };
271
272   //
273   // Instantiate the router.
274   //
275   var router = Router(routes);
276 ```
277
278 <a name="adhoc-routing"></a>
279 ## Adhoc Routing
280
281 When developing large client-side or server-side applications it is not always possible to define routes in one location. Usually individual decoupled components register their own routes with the application router. We refer to this as _Adhoc Routing._ Lets take a look at the API `director` exposes for adhoc routing:
282
283 **Client-side Routing**
284
285 ``` js
286   var router = new Router().init();
287
288   router.on('/some/resource', function () {
289     //
290     // Do something on `/#/some/resource`
291     //
292   });
293 ```
294
295 **HTTP Routing**
296
297 ``` js
298   var router = new director.http.Router();
299
300   router.get(/\/some\/resource/, function () {
301     //
302     // Do something on an GET to `/some/resource`
303     //
304   });
305 ```
306
307 <a name="scoped-routing"></a>
308 ## Scoped Routing
309
310 In large web appliations, both [Client-side](#client-side) and [Server-side](#http-routing), routes are often scoped within a few individual resources. Director exposes a simple way to do this for [Adhoc Routing](#adhoc-routing) scenarios:
311
312 ``` js
313   var router = new director.http.Router();
314
315   //
316   // Create routes inside the `/users` scope.
317   //
318   router.path(/\/users\/(\w+)/, function () {
319     //
320     // The `this` context of the function passed to `.path()`
321     // is the Router itself.
322     //
323
324     this.post(function (id) {
325       //
326       // Create the user with the specified `id`.
327       //
328     });
329
330     this.get(function (id) {
331       //
332       // Retreive the user with the specified `id`.
333       //
334     });
335
336     this.get(/\/friends/, function (id) {
337       //
338       // Get the friends for the user with the specified `id`.
339       //
340     });
341   });
342 ```
343
344 <a name="routing-events"></a>
345 ## Routing Events
346
347 In `director`, a "routing event" is a named property in the [Routing Table](#routing-table) which can be assigned to a function or an Array of functions to be called when a route is matched in a call to `router.dispatch()`.
348
349 * **on:** A function or Array of functions to execute when the route is matched.
350 * **before:** A function or Array of functions to execute before calling the `on` method(s).
351
352 **Client-side only**
353
354 * **after:** A function or Array of functions to execute when leaving a particular route.
355 * **once:** A function or Array of functions to execute only once for a particular route.
356
357 <a name="configuration"></a>
358 ## Configuration
359
360 Given the flexible nature of `director` there are several options available for both the [Client-side](#client-side) and [Server-side](#http-routing). These options can be set using the `.configure()` method:
361
362 ``` js
363   var router = new director.Router(routes).configure(options);
364 ```
365
366 The `options` are:
367
368 * **recurse:** Controls [route recursion](#route-recursion). Use `forward`, `backward`, or `false`. Default is `false` Client-side, and `backward` Server-side.
369 * **strict:** If set to `false`, then trailing slashes (or other delimiters) are allowed in routes. Default is `true`.
370 * **async:** Controls [async routing](#async-routing). Use `true` or `false`. Default is `false`.
371 * **delimiter:** Character separator between route fragments. Default is `/`.
372 * **notfound:** A function to call if no route is found on a call to `router.dispatch()`.
373 * **on:** A function (or list of functions) to call on every call to `router.dispatch()` when a route is found.
374 * **before:** A function (or list of functions) to call before every call to `router.dispatch()` when a route is found.
375
376 **Client-side only**
377
378 * **resource:** An object to which string-based routes will be bound. This can be especially useful for late-binding to route functions (such as async client-side requires).
379 * **after:** A function (or list of functions) to call when a given route is no longer the active route.
380 * **html5history:** If set to `true` and client supports `pushState()`, then uses HTML5 History API instead of hash fragments. See [History API](#history-api) for more information.
381 * **run_handler_in_init:** If `html5history` is enabled, the route handler by default is executed upon `Router.init()` since with real URIs the router can not know if it should call a route handler or not. Setting this to `false` disables the route handler initial execution.
382
383 <a name="url-matching"></a>
384 ## URL Matching
385
386 ``` js
387   var router = Router({
388     //
389     // given the route '/dog/yella'.
390     //
391     '/dog': {
392       '/:color': {
393         //
394         // this function will return the value 'yella'.
395         //
396         on: function (color) { console.log(color) }
397       }
398     }
399   });
400 ```
401
402 Routes can sometimes become very complex, `simple/:tokens` don't always suffice. Director supports regular expressions inside the route names. The values captured from the regular expressions are passed to your listener function.
403
404 ``` js
405   var router = Router({
406     //
407     // given the route '/hello/world'.
408     //
409     '/hello': {
410       '/(\\w+)': {
411         //
412         // this function will return the value 'world'.
413         //
414         on: function (who) { console.log(who) }
415       }
416     }
417   });
418 ```
419
420 ``` js
421   var router = Router({
422     //
423     // given the route '/hello/world/johny/appleseed'.
424     //
425     '/hello': {
426       '/world/?([^\/]*)\/([^\/]*)/?': function (a, b) {
427         console.log(a, b);
428       }
429     }
430   });
431 ```
432
433 <a name="url-params"></a>
434 ## URL Parameters
435
436 When you are using the same route fragments it is more descriptive to define these fragments by name and then use them in your [Routing Table](#routing-table) or [Adhoc Routes](#adhoc-routing). Consider a simple example where a `userId` is used repeatedly.
437
438 ``` js
439   //
440   // Create a router. This could also be director.cli.Router() or
441   // director.http.Router().
442   //
443   var router = new director.Router();
444
445   //
446   // A route could be defined using the `userId` explicitly.
447   //
448   router.on(/([\w-_]+)/, function (userId) { });
449
450   //
451   // Define a shorthand for this fragment called `userId`.
452   //
453   router.param('userId', /([\\w\\-]+)/);
454
455   //
456   // Now multiple routes can be defined with the same
457   // regular expression.
458   //
459   router.on('/anything/:userId', function (userId) { });
460   router.on('/something-else/:userId', function (userId) { });
461 ```
462
463 <a name="route-recursion"></a>
464 ## Route Recursion
465
466 Can be assigned the value of `forward` or `backward`. The recurse option will determine the order in which to fire the listeners that are associated with your routes. If this option is NOT specified or set to null, then only the listeners associated with an exact match will be fired.
467
468 ### No recursion, with the URL /dog/angry
469
470 ``` js
471   var routes = {
472     '/dog': {
473       '/angry': {
474         //
475         // Only this method will be fired.
476         //
477         on: growl
478       },
479       on: bark
480     }
481   };
482
483   var router = Router(routes);
484 ```
485
486 ### Recursion set to `backward`, with the URL /dog/angry
487
488 ``` js
489   var routes = {
490     '/dog': {
491       '/angry': {
492         //
493         // This method will be fired first.
494         //
495         on: growl
496       },
497       //
498       // This method will be fired second.
499       //
500       on: bark
501     }
502   };
503
504   var router = Router(routes).configure({ recurse: 'backward' });
505 ```
506
507 ### Recursion set to `forward`, with the URL /dog/angry
508
509 ``` js
510   var routes = {
511     '/dog': {
512       '/angry': {
513         //
514         // This method will be fired second.
515         //
516         on: growl
517       },
518       //
519       // This method will be fired first.
520       //
521       on: bark
522     }
523   };
524
525   var router = Router(routes).configure({ recurse: 'forward' });
526 ```
527
528 ### Breaking out of recursion, with the URL /dog/angry
529
530 ``` js
531   var routes = {
532     '/dog': {
533       '/angry': {
534         //
535         // This method will be fired first.
536         //
537         on: function() { return false; }
538       },
539       //
540       // This method will not be fired.
541       //
542       on: bark
543     }
544   };
545
546   //
547   // This feature works in reverse with recursion set to true.
548   //
549   var router = Router(routes).configure({ recurse: 'backward' });
550 ```
551
552 <a name="async-routing"></a>
553 ## Async Routing
554
555 Before diving into how Director exposes async routing, you should understand [Route Recursion](#route-recursion). At it's core route recursion is about evaluating a series of functions gathered when traversing the [Routing Table](#routing-table).
556
557 Normally this series of functions is evaluated synchronously. In async routing, these functions are evaluated asynchronously. Async routing can be extremely useful both on the client-side and the server-side:
558
559 * **Client-side:** To ensure an animation or other async operations (such as HTTP requests for authentication) have completed before continuing evaluation of a route.
560 * **Server-side:** To ensure arbitrary async operations (such as performing authentication) have completed before continuing the evaluation of a route.
561
562 The method signatures for route functions in synchronous and asynchronous evaluation are different: async route functions take an additional `next()` callback.
563
564 ### Synchronous route functions
565
566 ``` js
567   var router = new director.Router();
568
569   router.on('/:foo/:bar/:bazz', function (foo, bar, bazz) {
570     //
571     // Do something asynchronous with `foo`, `bar`, and `bazz`.
572     //
573   });
574 ```
575
576 ### Asynchronous route functions
577
578 ``` js
579   var router = new director.http.Router().configure({ async: true });
580
581   router.on('/:foo/:bar/:bazz', function (foo, bar, bazz, next) {
582     //
583     // Go do something async, and determine that routing should stop
584     //
585     next(false);
586   });
587 ```
588
589 <a name="resources"></a>
590 ## Resources
591
592 **Available on the Client-side only.** An object literal containing functions. If a host object is specified, your route definitions can provide string literals that represent the function names inside the host object. A host object can provide the means for better encapsulation and design.
593
594 ``` js
595
596   var router = Router({
597
598     '/hello': {
599       '/usa': 'americas',
600       '/china': 'asia'
601     }
602
603   }).configure({ resource: container }).init();
604
605   var container = {
606     americas: function() { return true; },
607     china: function() { return true; }
608   };
609
610 ```
611
612 <a name="history-api"></a>
613 ## History API
614
615 **Available on the Client-side only.** Director supports using HTML5 History API instead of hash fragments for navigation. To use the API, pass `{html5history: true}` to `configure()`. Use of the API is enabled only if the client supports `pushState()`.
616
617 Using the API gives you cleaner URIs but they come with a cost. Unlike with hash fragments your route URIs must exist. When the client enters a page, say http://foo.com/bar/baz, the web server must respond with something meaningful. Usually this means that your web server checks the URI points to something that, in a sense, exists, and then serves the client the JavaScript application.
618
619 If you're after a single-page application you can not use plain old `<a href="/bar/baz">` tags for navigation anymore. When such link is clicked, web browsers try to ask for the resource from server which is not of course desired for a single-page application. Instead you need to use e.g. click handlers and call the `setRoute()` method yourself.
620
621 <a name="attach-to-this"></a>
622 ## Attach Properties To `this`
623
624 Generally, the `this` object bound to route handlers, will contain the request in `this.req` and the response in `this.res`. One may attach additional properties to `this` with the `router.attach` method:
625
626 ```js
627   var director = require('director');
628
629   var router = new director.http.Router().configure(options);
630
631   //
632   // Attach properties to `this`
633   //
634   router.attach(function () {
635     this.data = [1,2,3];
636   });
637
638   //
639   // Access properties attached to `this` in your routes!
640   //
641   router.get('/hello', function () {
642     this.res.writeHead(200, { 'content-type': 'text/plain' });
643
644     //
645     // Response will be `[1,2,3]`!
646     //
647     this.res.end(this.data);
648   });
649 ```
650
651 This API may be used to attach convenience methods to the `this` context of route handlers.
652
653 <a name="http-streaming-body-parsing">
654 ## HTTP Streaming and Body Parsing
655
656 When you are performing HTTP routing there are two common scenarios:
657
658 * Buffer the request body and parse it according to the `Content-Type` header (usually `application/json` or `application/x-www-form-urlencoded`).
659 * Stream the request body by manually calling `.pipe` or listening to the `data` and `end` events.
660
661 By default `director.http.Router()` will attempt to parse either the `.chunks` or `.body` properties set on the request parameter passed to `router.dispatch(request, response, callback)`. The router instance will also wait for the `end` event before firing any routes.
662
663 **Default Behavior**
664
665 ``` js
666   var director = require('director');
667
668   var router = new director.http.Router();
669
670   router.get('/', function () {
671     //
672     // This will not work, because all of the data
673     // events and the end event have already fired.
674     //
675     this.req.on('data', function (chunk) {
676       console.log(chunk)
677     });
678   });
679 ```
680
681 In [flatiron][2], `director` is used in conjunction with [union][3] which uses a `BufferedStream` proxy to the raw `http.Request` instance. [union][3] will set the `req.chunks` property for you and director will automatically parse the body. If you wish to perform this buffering yourself directly with `director` you can use a simple request handler in your http server:
682
683 ``` js
684   var http = require('http'),
685       director = require('director');
686
687   var router = new director.http.Router();
688
689   var server = http.createServer(function (req, res) {
690     req.chunks = [];
691     req.on('data', function (chunk) {
692       req.chunks.push(chunk.toString());
693     });
694
695     router.dispatch(req, res, function (err) {
696       if (err) {
697         res.writeHead(404);
698         res.end();
699       }
700
701       console.log('Served ' + req.url);
702     });
703   });
704
705   router.post('/', function () {
706     this.res.writeHead(200, { 'Content-Type': 'application/json' })
707     this.res.end(JSON.stringify(this.req.body));
708   });
709 ```
710
711 **Streaming Support**
712
713 If you wish to get access to the request stream before the `end` event is fired, you can pass the `{ stream: true }` options to the route.
714
715 ``` js
716   var director = require('director');
717
718   var router = new director.http.Router();
719
720   router.get('/', { stream: true }, function () {
721     //
722     // This will work because the route handler is invoked
723     // immediately without waiting for the `end` event.
724     //
725     this.req.on('data', function (chunk) {
726       console.log(chunk);
727     });
728   });
729 ```
730
731 <a name="instance-methods"></a>
732 ## Instance methods
733
734 ### configure(options)
735 * `options` {Object}: Options to configure this instance with.
736
737 Configures the Router instance with the specified `options`. See [Configuration](#configuration) for more documentation.
738
739 ### param(token, matcher)
740 * token {string}: Named parameter token to set to the specified `matcher`
741 * matcher {string|Regexp}: Matcher for the specified `token`.
742
743 Adds a route fragment for the given string `token` to the specified regex `matcher` to this Router instance. See [URL Parameters](#url-params) for more documentation.
744
745 ### on(method, path, route)
746 * `method` {string}: Method to insert within the Routing Table (e.g. `on`, `get`, etc.).
747 * `path` {string}: Path within the Routing Table to set the `route` to.
748 * `route` {function|Array}: Route handler to invoke for the `method` and `path`.
749
750 Adds the `route` handler for the specified `method` and `path` within the [Routing Table](#routing-table).
751
752 ### path(path, routesFn)
753 * `path` {string|Regexp}: Scope within the Routing Table to invoke the `routesFn` within.
754 * `routesFn` {function}: Adhoc Routing function with calls to `this.on()`, `this.get()` etc.
755
756 Invokes the `routesFn` within the scope of the specified `path` for this Router instance.
757
758 ### dispatch(method, path[, callback])
759 * method {string}: Method to invoke handlers for within the Routing Table
760 * path {string}: Path within the Routing Table to match
761 * callback {function}: Invoked once all route handlers have been called.
762
763 Dispatches the route handlers matched within the [Routing Table](#routing-table) for this instance for the specified `method` and `path`.
764
765 ### mount(routes, path)
766 * routes {object}: Partial routing table to insert into this instance.
767 * path {string|Regexp}: Path within the Routing Table to insert the `routes` into.
768
769 Inserts the partial [Routing Table](#routing-table), `routes`, into the Routing Table for this Router instance at the specified `path`.
770
771 ## Instance methods (Client-side only)
772
773 ### init([redirect])
774 * `redirect` {String}: This value will be used if '/#/' is not found in the URL. (e.g., init('/') will resolve to '/#/', init('foo') will resolve to '/#foo').
775
776 Initialize the router, start listening for changes to the URL.
777
778 ### getRoute([index])
779 * `index` {Number}: The hash value is divided by forward slashes, each section then has an index, if this is provided, only that section of the route will be returned.
780
781 Returns the entire route or just a section of it.
782
783 ### setRoute(route)
784 * `route` {String}: Supply a route value, such as `home/stats`.
785
786 Set the current route.
787
788 ### setRoute(start, length)
789 * `start` {Number} - The position at which to start removing items.
790 * `length` {Number} - The number of items to remove from the route.
791
792 Remove a segment from the current route.
793
794 ### setRoute(index, value)
795 * `index` {Number} - The hash value is divided by forward slashes, each section then has an index.
796 * `value` {String} - The new value to assign the the position indicated by the first parameter.
797
798 Set a segment of the current route.
799
800 <a name="faq"></a>
801 # Frequently Asked Questions
802
803 ## What About SEO?
804
805 Is using a Client-side router a problem for SEO? Yes. If advertising is a requirement, you are probably building a "Web Page" and not a "Web Application". Director on the client is meant for script-heavy Web Applications.
806
807 # Licence
808
809 (The MIT License)
810
811 Copyright (c) 2010 Nodejitsu Inc. <http://www.twitter.com/nodejitsu>
812
813 Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software and associated documentation files (the 'Software'), to deal in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:
814
815 The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.
816
817 THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED 'AS IS', WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM, OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN THE SOFTWARE.
818
819 [0]: http://github.com/flatiron/director
820 [1]: https://github.com/flatiron/director/blob/master/build/director.min.js
821 [2]: http://github.com/flatiron/flatiron
822 [3]: http://github.com/flatiron/union