2006-02-12 Joost de Valk <jdevalk@opendarwin.org>
authoreseidel <eseidel@268f45cc-cd09-0410-ab3c-d52691b4dbfc>
Sun, 12 Feb 2006 22:07:15 +0000 (22:07 +0000)
committereseidel <eseidel@268f45cc-cd09-0410-ab3c-d52691b4dbfc>
Sun, 12 Feb 2006 22:07:15 +0000 (22:07 +0000)
        Reviewed by eseidel.

        Added a little piece of text to the page about reductions, pointing to the bugzilla page.

        Changed "Sign up for a" into "Create a" bugzilla account.

        * quality/reduction.html:
        * quality/reporting.html:

git-svn-id: https://svn.webkit.org/repository/webkit/trunk@12772 268f45cc-cd09-0410-ab3c-d52691b4dbfc

WebKitSite/ChangeLog
WebKitSite/quality/reduction.html
WebKitSite/quality/reporting.html

index d50d1f6..12308fc 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,16 @@
 2006-02-12  Joost de Valk  <jdevalk@opendarwin.org>
 
+        Reviewed by eseidel.
+
+        Added a little piece of text to the page about reductions, pointing to the bugzilla page. 
+
+        Changed "Sign up for a" into "Create a" bugzilla account.
+
+        * quality/reduction.html:
+        * quality/reporting.html:
+
+2006-02-12  Joost de Valk  <jdevalk@opendarwin.org>
+
         Reviewed by Darin.
 
         Added a Bugzilla page, which contains information about creating a Bugzilla account, what editbugs and canconfirm
index 54c3bf8..8fd23a0 100644 (file)
@@ -1,12 +1,12 @@
 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
 <html>
 <head>
-  <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
- http-equiv="content-type">
+  <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1" http-equiv="content-type">
   <title>Test Case Reduction</title>
-  <link rel=stylesheet href="../webkitdev.css">
+  <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../webkitdev.css">
 </head>
 <body>
+
 <!--begin sidebar -->
 <iframe id="sidebar" src="../sidebar.html"></iframe>
 <!--end sidebar -->
 <h1 id="banner">Test Case Reduction</h1>
 
 <div id="content">
-<h2>A general guide to test case reduction</h2>
-<p>
-The basic idea behind bug reduction is to take a page that demonstrates a problem and
-remove as much content as possible while still reproducing the original problem.
-</p>
-<h4>Why is this needed?</h4>
-<p>
-A reduced test case can help identify the central problem on the
-page by eliminating irrelevant information, i.e., portions of the HTML
-page's structure that have nothing to do with the problem.
-With a reduced test case, the development team will spend
-less time identifying the problem and more time determining the
-solution. Also, since a site can change its content or design, the
-problem may no longer occur on the real-world site. 
-By constructing a test case you can capture the initial problem.
-</p>
-<h4>The first steps</h4>
-<p>
-Really the first step in reducing a page is to identify that main
-problem of the page. For example:
-<ul>
-  <li>Does the page have text overlapping an image? </li>
-  <li>Is there a form button that fails to work?</li>
-  <li>Is there a portion of the page missing or misaligned?</li>
-</ul>
-</p>
-<p>
-After you have made this determination, you need to create a local copy
-of the page created from the page source window. After saving this
-source, it's a good idea to put a <code>&lt;BASE&gt;</code> element in the
-<code>HEAD</code> so that any images/external style sheet or scripts that use a
-relative path will get loaded. After the <code>BASE</code> element has been added,
-load the local copy into the browser and verify that problem is still
-occurring. In this case, let's assume the problem is still present.
-</p>
-<h4>Work from top to bottom</h4>
-<p>
-In general, it's best to start from the top of the <code>&lt;DOCTYPE&gt;</code> and
-work down through the <code>HEAD</code> to the <code>BODY</code> element. Take a look at the HTML
-file in a text editor and view what types of elements are present in the
-<code>&lt;head&gt;</code>. Typically, the <code>HEAD</code> will include the <code>&lt;title&gt;</code>
-element, which is required, and elements such as <code>&lt;link&gt;</code>,
-<code>&lt;style&gt;</code> and <code>&lt;script&gt;</code>.
-</p>
-<p>
-The reduction process is to remove one element at a time, save, and reload the
-test case. If you have removed the element and the page is still
-displaying the problem, continue with the next element. If removing an
-element in the <code>HEAD</code> causes the problem to not occur, you may have found
-one piece in of the problem. Re-add this element back into the <code>HEAD</code>,
-reload the page and confirm the problem is still occurring and move
-on to the next element in the <code>HEAD</code>.
-</p>
+    <h2>A general guide to test case reduction</h2>
+    <p>
+        The basic idea behind bug reduction is to take a page that demonstrates a problem and
+        remove as much content as possible while still reproducing the original problem.
+    </p>
+
+    <h4>Why is this needed?</h4>
+    <p>
+        A reduced test case can help identify the central problem on the
+        page by eliminating irrelevant information, i.e., portions of the HTML
+        page's structure that have nothing to do with the problem.
+        With a reduced test case, the development team will spend
+        less time identifying the problem and more time determining the
+        solution. Also, since a site can change its content or design, the
+        problem may no longer occur on the real-world site. 
+        By constructing a test case you can capture the initial problem.
+    </p>
+
+    <h4>The first steps</h4>
+    <p>
+        Really the first step in reducing a page is to identify that main
+        problem of the page. For example:
+        <ul>
+            <li>Does the page have text overlapping an image? </li>
+            <li>Is there a form button that fails to work?</li>
+            <li>Is there a portion of the page missing or misaligned?</li>
+        </ul>
+    </p>
+    <p>
+        After you have made this determination, you need to create a local copy
+        of the page created from the page source window. After saving this
+        source, it's a good idea to put a <code>&lt;BASE&gt;</code> element in the
+        <code>HEAD</code> so that any images/external style sheet or scripts that use a
+        relative path will get loaded. After the <code>BASE</code> element has been added,
+        load the local copy into the browser and verify that problem is still
+        occurring. In this case, let's assume the problem is still present.
+    </p>
 
-<h4>Finished the <code>HEAD</code>? Continue with the <code>BODY</code>!</h4>
-<p>
-Once the <code>HEAD</code> element has been reduced, you need to start reducing
-the number of required elements in the <code>BODY</code>. This will tend to be the
-most time consuming since hundreds (thousands) of elements will be
-present. The general practice is start removing elements by both their
-<code>&lt;start&gt;</code> and <code>&lt;/end&gt;</code> elements. This is especially true for
-tables, which are frequently nested. You can speed up this process by
-selecting groups of elements and removing them but ideally you need to
-save and reload the test case each time to verify the problem is
-happening.
-</p>
-<p>
-Another way to help you identify unnecessary elements is to temporary
-uncheck 'Enable Javascript' in the Preferences. If you turn this option
-off and loading your test case still reproduces the problem, then any
-script elements that are present can be removed since they are not a
-factor in this issue. Let's say that you have reduced the page down to
-a nested table with an ordered list with an <code>&lt;link&gt;</code> element that need
-to be present. It's good practice to identify that CSS rule that is
-being in the external file and add it directly to the test case. Create
-a <code>&lt;style&gt;</code> <code>&lt;/style&gt;</code> in the head and copy/paste the contents
-of the .css file into this style element. Remove the <code>&lt;link&gt;</code> and
-save the changes. Load the test case and verify the problem is still
-occurring. Now manually delete or comment out each CSS rule until you
-have just the required set of rules to reproduce.
-</p>
+    <h4>Work from top to bottom</h4>
+    <p>
+        In general, it's best to start from the top of the <code>&lt;DOCTYPE&gt;</code> and
+        work down through the <code>HEAD</code> to the <code>BODY</code> element. Take a look at the HTML
+        file in a text editor and view what types of elements are present in the
+        <code>&lt;head&gt;</code>. Typically, the <code>HEAD</code> will include the <code>&lt;title&gt;</code>
+        element, which is required, and elements such as <code>&lt;link&gt;</code>,
+        <code>&lt;style&gt;</code> and <code>&lt;script&gt;</code>.
+    </p>
+    <p>
+        The reduction process is to remove one element at a time, save, and reload the
+        test case. If you have removed the element and the page is still
+        displaying the problem, continue with the next element. If removing an
+        element in the <code>HEAD</code> causes the problem to not occur, you may have found
+        one piece in of the problem. Re-add this element back into the <code>HEAD</code>,
+        reload the page and confirm the problem is still occurring and move
+        on to the next element in the <code>HEAD</code>.
+    </p>
+    
+    <h4>Finished the <code>HEAD</code>? Continue with the <code>BODY</code>!</h4>
+    <p>
+        Once the <code>HEAD</code> element has been reduced, you need to start reducing
+        the number of required elements in the <code>BODY</code>. This will tend to be the
+        most time consuming since hundreds (thousands) of elements will be
+        present. The general practice is start removing elements by both their
+        <code>&lt;start&gt;</code> and <code>&lt;/end&gt;</code> elements. This is especially true for
+        tables, which are frequently nested. You can speed up this process by
+        selecting groups of elements and removing them but ideally you need to
+        save and reload the test case each time to verify the problem is
+        happening.
+    </p>
+    
+    <h4>Another method</h4>
+    <p>
+        Another way to help you identify unnecessary elements is to temporary
+        uncheck 'Enable Javascript' in the Preferences. If you turn this option
+        off and loading your test case still reproduces the problem, then any
+        script elements that are present can be removed since they are not a
+        factor in this issue. Let's say that you have reduced the page down to
+        a nested table with an ordered list with an <code>&lt;link&gt;</code> element that need
+        to be present. It's good practice to identify that CSS rule that is
+        being in the external file and add it directly to the test case. Create
+        a <code>&lt;style&gt;</code> <code>&lt;/style&gt;</code> in the head and copy/paste the contents
+        of the .css file into this style element. Remove the <code>&lt;link&gt;</code> and
+        save the changes. Load the test case and verify the problem is still
+        occurring. Now manually delete or comment out each CSS rule until you
+        have just the required set of rules to reproduce.
+    </p>
+    
+    <h4>Adding to the bug</h4>
+    <p>
+        When you've finished your reduction, you should add it to the bug. It's quite likely
+        that in the process of reducing, you have found the root cause of the problem, so
+        you are able to set the right component. If you do not have the rights to change
+        the component, read about how to get them in this <a href="bugzilla.html">document
+        about Bugzilla</a>.
+    </p>
+    
 </div>
 </body>
 </html>
index ec7951d..dc37bed 100644 (file)
 </li>
 <li>
     <strong>Create a Bugzilla account</strong><br>
-    You will need to <a href="bugzilla.html">sign up for a Bugzilla account</a> to be able
+    You will need to <a href="bugzilla.html">create a Bugzilla account</a> to be able
     to report bugs (and to comment on them). Once you have an account you can report bugs on any product on 
     <a href="http://www.opendarwin.org">OpenDarwin.org</a>. WebKit is one of the individual products listed in Bugzilla, and all 
     of our bugs can be classified in various components under the WebKit product. If you have registered, proceed to the